Italian Localisation and Website Translation

Millions of people worldwide use the internet to find products and information every day. If your business trades worldwide, you’ll probably need your website to reflect that by having it translated into several languages, including Italian. We call this process website translation and localisation.

Our project managers can help you decide which website translation services and localisation solutions suit your needs best.

Italian website localisation and translation

Working from your source files and using our specially designed software, our qualified and experienced Italian website translators and Italian website localisation specialists will extract the content of your site, translate it in a style appropriate to the locale, then proofread and edit it. If you prefer, we can also work from MS Word files supplied by you, (or any number of other source file formats).

Our Italian translators will identify aspects of the source content that are suitable for website localisation and consider aspects including:

  • religion
  • mores
  • social and commercial habits
  • sense of humour
  • idiomatic expressions
  • metaphors
  • rules of conduct
  • ethical norms.

There may be some aspects of your Italian website translation and other material that are global and necessary for brand awareness. There may be product names or trademarks that need to remain consistent across all language versions.

The project manager working on your assignment will work with you to create a glossary of any terms that need to remain consistent across all versions of the site.

Italian translation and software localisation

Our in-house software translation and localisation process and tools means “local” users will be able to interact fully with your site.

  • Keywords and metadata tags can be localised for Italian consumers to achieve best possible optimisation opportunities
  • Layout can be adapted to accommodate longer text strings which may occur as a result of translation into Italian
  • All elements can be localised for Poland including text files, menus, dialogs, bitmaps and icons
  • We can work with all the major Windows software formats as well as text files and tagged formats such as XML and HTML

We can either return the Italian translated files to you for uploading and testing, or we can carry out a test of the localised version for you.

Brand name linguistic analysis

Because some brand names and slogans have unexpected cultural connotations, we also have an experienced team of Italian brand name analysts. They can ensure your logo, slogan or other translations will not be misinterpreted.

Please refer to our client feedback page to learn more about the unbeatable Italian language service we offer.


If you have a project you would like to discuss, do please call us on +44 (0)1544 388040 or contact us via our free Quote & File Uploads form.


Italian is the official language of Italy and is spoken by about 70 million people, primarily in this country. It's the official language of San Marino as well, and one of the official languages of Switzerland, spoken mainly in Ticino and Grigioni cantons.

The Italian alphabet is only 21 letters. Italian uses the same Roman characters as the English language… minus 5 of them. The letters j, k, w, x, and y simply do not exist in Italian, so if you happen to see them used in an Italian text, that means the word is borrowed from another language!


Non so dove i gabbiani abbiano il nido,
ove trovino pace.
Io son come loro
in perpetuo volo.
La vita la sfioro
com’essi l’acqua ad acciuffare il cibo.
E come forse anch’essi amo la quiete,
la gran quiete marina,
ma il mio destino è vivere
balenando in burrasca.

Vincenzo Cardarelli, da “Poesie”

Italian example video

These are intended as language sample videos - the subtitles/captions were not created by Knockhundred Translations.
You can find more information on our subtitling services here

Sopra la panca la capra campa, sotto la panca la capra crepa.
On the bench the goat lives, under the bench the goat dies.

Courtesy of Omniglot