Language services in Devon

Our language services in Devon

Knockhundred offers professional interpreting and translation solutions throughout Devon. To date, our linguists have worked in over 190 languages and the list continues to grow. You can find a full list of our languages here.

Our teams of qualified, skilled language interpreters can attend your assignment 24/7 in Dartmouth, Exeter, Torquay, Totnes, Barnstaple, Ilfracombe, Plymouth, Paignton, Tiverton, Newton Abbot, Tavistock and throughout Devon.

Knockhundred Translations provides several types of interpreting, including telephone interpreting. For more information on our interpreters and the interpreting services we offer in Devon, please visit our main interpreting page.

Alternatively you can visit the relevant language service page below:

Do you have a certificate or official document that needs translating and/or certifying?

If you live in Devon, we can help with your certified document translation requirements. Visit our certified, notarised or FCO legalised translation page for more information.

Quite interesting facts about Devon

Dartmouth. Did you know that the world’s first Jack Russell dog was bred by a Parson born in Dartmouth called - Jack Russell ? The cleric was a keen hunter, and bred the dog to flush foxes out of their holes without hurting them, so as not to spoil his sport (or what he regarded as such depending on your standpoint).

Exeter. Did you know that Exeter was unique in medieval Britain in that it had a man-made drinking water system that brought pure spring water into the city? There are passages still to be found under the high street that were excavated in the 14th century for this. The passages have become a tourist attraction, accessed via Paris Street in the Princesshay Quarter. The downside to the original system, by the way, was that it used lead piping.

Plymouth. Did you know that the children’s rhyme Old Mother Hubbard was written in Yealmpton near Plymouth? Sarah Catherine Martin wrote it while staying there in Kitley House, now a hotel. The subject of her pictures and verses was supposedly the housekeeper, but it is thought Martin at the very least built on existing folk verse, which some claim was a carefully hidden criticism of Wolsey and Henry VIII.