Language services in Surrey

Our language services in Surrey

Knockhundred offers professional interpreting and translation solutions throughout Surrey. To date, our linguists have worked in over 190 languages and the list continues to grow. You can find a full list of our languages here.

Our teams of qualified, skilled language interpreters can attend your assignment 24/7 in Guildford, Croydon, Woking, Sutton, Kingston-on-Thames, Wandsworth, Brixton, Wimbledon, Ewell, Camberley, Dorking, Weybridge and throughout Surrey.

Knockhundred Translations provides several types of interpreting, including telephone interpreting. For more information on our interpreters and the interpreting services we offer in Surrey, please visit our main interpreting page.

Alternatively you can visit the relevant language service page below:

Do you have a certificate or official document that needs translating and/or certifying?

If you live in Surrey, we can help with your certified document translation requirements. Visit our certified, notarised or FCO legalised translation page for more information.

Quite interesting facts about Surrey

Woking. Did you know that when the Martians first land in H.G. Wells ’ book 'War of the Worlds' they do so on Horsell Common, where Wells lived at the time? The town centre commemorates the link with a statue of a Martian tripod.

Dorking. Did you know that Charles Dickens wrote much of his "pickwick papers" whilst staying in Dorking at the White Horse and based many of the characters on local people?

Weybridge. Did you know that James I chose Oatlands Park near Weybridge as the centre of his proposed silkworm industry? Inigo Jones designed a silkworm house; John Tredescant was in Charles I’s reign appointed ‘Keeper of His Majesty’s Gardens, Vines and Silkworms’ there; and a major national push was made to plant mulberry trees for the worms to feed upon. Unfortunately in true bureaucratic style they planted black mulberries, nice fruit great jam but not the white mulberry on which the silkworm thrived. The wrong sort of mulberry, in other words.